Longridge Towers' links withChinese school are flourishing

Longridge Towers School has hosted visitors from Ealing International College in the Dalian region of China.

Sunday, 25th February 2018, 07:09 am
Longridge Towers School has hosted visitors from Ealing International College in the Dalian region of China.

The schools celebrated 11 years of working together and this is the third visit arranged for pupils to explore the benefits of a UK education.

The special relationship between the schools in the north east of England and the north east of China began in January 2007.

Longridge Towers School has hosted visitors from Ealing International College in the Dalian region of China.

The relationship is built on the strengths of the UK curriculum, a belief in a tailored all-round education, excellence in English and the creation of international opportunities for pupils.

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The schools have been strengthened through their common aims and practices.

The extension of Dalian Ealing International College in Dalian into boarding and into a junior department last year mirrors the offering of Longridge.

Jenny Liu, principal of Ealing International School, said that in China pupils are used to a more regimented school day.

Longridge Towers School has hosted visitors from Ealing International College in the Dalian region of China.

While a change in diet can be a problem for Chinese students studying in the UK, the Longridge catering staff rose to the challenge and all the students enjoyed the international menu.

Headmaster Jonathan Lee said: “We have been looking forward to hosting the students from Dalian this year as both of our school communities benefit from the exchange of cultural and educational experiences.”

Both heads were delighted with the extent of interest from pupils during the visit.

Pupils were most interested in the breadth of practical study in the UK and enjoyed being able to engage teachers in discussion.

The visit coincided with a Collapsed Curriculum day centred on the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Mrs Liu was amazed to see the youngest children in the school challenge gender stereotypes when meeting Dr Doherty.

The day was rounded off with a discussion with Pete Ritchie, owner of Whitmuir, The Organic Place and executive director of Nourish Scotland – not something students experience every day.