Barracks plans are boosted by surplus funding

Extra funding is to be put towards the preparation of a business plan looking at future options for Berwick Barracks.

Friday, 4th March 2016, 10:09 am
Updated Saturday, 5th March 2016, 09:06 am
Berwick Barracks.

The Berwick Barracks Reawakening Project received £48,000 from the Government’s Coastal Revival Fund in December.

However, there is nearly £10,000 left over after the funds for the two tenders already approved, plus other costs, are taken out of the equation.

Councillor Eric Goodyer said: “The spare funding will help prepare a business plan to develop the barracks into something successful.”

Berwick Town Council, which has worked alongside the Friends of Berwick and District Museum and Archives on the scheme, formally approved the move at its meeting last week.

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Mayor Hazel Bettison said: “It’s good news for the town and it’s been achieved through working together.”

Heritage and culture specialists Jura Consulting will study the business case for the hub as a tourist attraction.

The firm will consider the activities that could be based there – including the Berwick Record Office, Archive and Museum – and the opportunities for making the hub commercially viable.

Historic building consultants Spence & Dower will report on the physical and technical feasibility of accommodating the hub’s different elements in the 18th century Berwick Barracks complex.

It is proposed to use these surplus funds to procure additional studies to assist with preparing costings for a schedule of works to be used to secure new tenders for delivering the required development.

These are a quantity surveyor’s report for £2,500 and a mechanical and electrical study for £6,000

It is proposed that a contingency of 10 per cent be held back at this time to cover any additional studies.

All expenditure must be completed by March 31 as a condition of funding.

Any changes to the buildings would have to be approved by English Heritage, which manages the site.