DCSIMG

Northern Lights illuminate our sky

Gary Young captured the Aurora Borealis illulinating Berwick lighthouse from Spittal point

Gary Young captured the Aurora Borealis illulinating Berwick lighthouse from Spittal point

The Aurora Borealis has been seen lighting up skies in Berwickshire, north Northumberland and across the country.

The rare and spectacular display, better known as the Northern Lights, was clearly visable in Berwick, HolyIsland, Coldstream, Eyemouth and elsewhere.

Gary Young and David Sanderson both captured this stunning image of the lights over Berwick pier from Spittal point.

John McGuffie captured the lights right on the border at around 9:45pm. His picturecaptured the display over Cornhill and Coldstream.

He said: “It was a spectacular display that lasted about 2 hours, peaking for around 30 minutes when it was very visible to the naked eye.”

The Northern Lights are usually visible in only the more northern parts of the UK, but a surge in geomagnetic activity last night led to them appearing much further south than usual.

The display occurs when explosions on the surface of the Sun hurl huge amounts of charged particles into space, according to the British Geological Survey (BGS).

Those thrown towards Earth are captured by its magnetic field and guided towards the geomagnetic polar regions.

Charged particles collide with gas molecules in the atmosphere, and the subsequent energy is given off as light.

Geomagnetic storms follow an 11-year “solar cycle”, and the last “solar maximum” was last year, according to the BGS.

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Did you capture a picture or video of the Aurora Borealis? Email it berwickpictures@tweeddalepress.co.uk and we’ll publish the best of them on our website and in next week’s paper.

 

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