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Hidden secrets of Flodden set to be unearthed

Chris Burgess has been appointed as Archaeology Manager for the Flodden 1513 Project, he will be leading the team trying to discover more of the story behind the battle including trying to pinpoint the exact site of the battle itself.

Chris Burgess has been appointed as Archaeology Manager for the Flodden 1513 Project, he will be leading the team trying to discover more of the story behind the battle including trying to pinpoint the exact site of the battle itself.

New archaeological excavations aim to pinpoint exactly where the fighting occurred during the Battle of Flodden of September 1513.

It is all part of the battle’s 500th anniversary commemorations being co-ordinated by the Flodden 1513 Ecomuseum.

It has appointed Chris Burgess as its archaeology manager to help bring the Flodden story to life.

The last medieval battle, Flodden was a turning point in the history of the UK, setting the stage for the subsequent Union of the Crowns between Scotland and England in 1603.

Chris has been tasked with engaging the local community with this important aspect of their heritage and to promote a better understanding of the battle and the events surrounding it.

He explained: “This is a great opportunity to strengthen cross border relations. I am hoping that the research and archaeological digs will help us have a better understanding of the stories behind the battle.

“This is not just a date in the history books, it is an event which changed the future of thousands of individuals and families and knowing more will help us to remember the dead of both sides.”

The project, which runs until December 2016, will excavate nine sites in total including Norham Castle which was beseiged by the invading Scots and also the Flodden battlefield.

The archaeology team hope to pin down precisely where the fighting occurred and better understand the site of the Scottish camp, where James IV’s army was outflanked.

Chris will be responsible for managing the digs, metal detecting and field walking as well as providing detailed reports and commissioning geophysical surveys.

As a child Chris spent many weekends and holidays on digs with his father in north Northumberland. He is now a part time archaeologist for Northumberland County Council and even before this appointment, was involved in the Flodden project on a voluntary basis.

Alistair Bowden, Flodden 1513 project manager, said: “I’m very pleased that Chris will be in charge of the archaeology projects associated with Flodden 1513.

“Anyone who hears him speak can’t fail to be enthused by his passion for history. His skill and knowledge will be a great asset in making the story come to life for a modern audience, making us see why our heritage plays such an important part in who we are today.”

 

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