DCSIMG

Council gets £2.9m extra to fix potholes

Julie P�rksen and Kate Cairns have welcomed the latest announcement that Northumberland County Council is to receive �2.9 million extra funding from the Government to help fix potholes.

Julie P�rksen and Kate Cairns have welcomed the latest announcement that Northumberland County Council is to receive �2.9 million extra funding from the Government to help fix potholes.

Northumberland County Council has been granted £2.9 million extra funding to try and address pothole problems over the coming months.

The grant from the Department for Transport is in addition to the £2.7 million extra from the ‘weather repair fund’ announced in March.

Julie Pörksen, prospective Lib Dem parliamentary candidate for Berwick, said: “I am very pleased the Government is prioritising pothole repairs; given the amount of potholes in Northumberland it will really help the council fix them.

“Potholes on our roads is an issue often raised by local residents and I would encourage everyone to report potholes to the council at www.northumberland.gov.uk or by calling 0845 600 6400 or one of the local numbers, especially since the council have pledged to fix all reported potholes.”

Kate Cairns, road safety campaigner and candidate for the Longhoughton County Council by-election, said: “The extent of the potholes on Northumberlands roads can cause significant danger for both cyclists and drivers who have to brake hard and swerve to avoid them.”

The national pothole fund provides £168 million to 148 councils, each receiving and average of £1.14 million to spend on potholes or other road maintenance. It aims to fix some three million potholes by March 2015.

All councils which applied for money get a share, but extra has been given to those which “demonstrate best practice in highways maintenance”.

Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin said: “Potholes are the bane of all our lives and the funding announced today is an important step in ridding our roads of this menace.

“But it is only one part of a massive programme of investment to get our country up to speed as part of this government’s long-term economic plan.”

It costs an estimated £53 to fix every pothole, the Department for Transport said. The money must be used to repair potholes or to ensure that they do not appear in the first place and councils must publish monthly updates on how many repairs have been carried out.

The Department for Transport said the money, first announced in Chancellor George Osborne’s Budget in March, was part of the biggest investment in roads since the 1970s.

It said £24bn would be spent on England’s strategic road network from 2010-21 with £7.4bn committed to local roads in the next Parliament.

 

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